Painting Your Horse

My personal goal is to provide you with a high quality painting of your horse which will be enjoyed for years to come. Your satisfaction is guaranteed. Oils have been used in portrait paintings for centuries. A quality stretched canvas will be used which can be framed if desired. If you like, I will finish the edges of the canvas so it can be presented without a frame.

Your personalized portrait will be painted using one of three options:

(1) I can use your quality photo (assuming the picture is of good quality with the correct lighting and position), or
(2) I can give you assistance for taking a photo I can use for a reference, or
(3) I can come to you to take the reference photo (for an added charge).

Obviously, the price will vary depending on the size of the painting. Below is a price list for the most common sizes (for other sizes, e-mail me for a quote).

Pricing:

11 x 14 – $325.00
12 x 16 – $395.00
16 x 20 – $525.00
20 x 30 – $750.00

Oil paints take a good bit of time to dry – about a month (possibly longer depend on the humidity and thickness of the paint). Your painting will not be shipped until it can be transported safely.

As mentioned earlier, all paintings come with a satisfaction guarantee. When the painting is finished, I will send you a picture of the painting for your approval. Upon your satisfaction, you will be billed at that time and the painting will be shipped to you. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me via e-mail at: dannyholder58@charter.net

Shipping cost will be calculated per your location and given to you with the initial quote. Shipping can be waved if you choose to pick up the painting locally. Prices are current as of January 2018 and are subject to change.

Instructions for taking good reference photos of your horse:

1.  Put the camera lens on the level with your horse’s eye. You might have to stand on a small step stool to get this position.

2.  Obviously, it would be good to get his/her ears up. There are apps available to make horse sounds which works really well. Note: try it first to test the horse’s-response. Some of these sounds can get horses overly excited.If you chose to use such sounds, have another person hold the sound producer in the direction you want the horse to look.

3.  A 3/4 view of the face is best. It makes the facial features stand out against the light source.

4.  Lighting is all important. If the lighting is straight with the camera (like a flash), the features will tend to be minimized. Experiment with the light angle to the horse’s face.

5.  For painting, it is best to have a dark or neutral background. It doesn’t matter what is in the background. Inside a barn is good or have trees behind the horse. The background can be painted to enhance the horse’s color and features later on.

6. Keep in mind, if the photos look good the painting will-look good. I use the photos to get the details and over all shape of the horse. If you like you can take some photos and send them to me to look at. I can help you pick out the best one.

7.  Your painting can be with or without tack.

Contact Danny C. Holder